I Haven't Been Paid, But They're Using My Images! (1)

I Haven’t Been Paid, But They’re Using My Images!

By: Caroline R. Kert, Esq.

I’ve noticed a recent trend with artists calling to get help resolving a contract issue. The scenario usually unfolds something like this:

  • The Artist had been contacted by a promotor/client/other artist to help capture photos or video.
  • There is no written agreement, other than a few texts back and forth about payment rate and when to show up to the shoot.
  • The Artist does the shoot, edits their product, and provides one or several complete products. This can be a series of photos or a few versions of a promotional video.
  • The client begins using the completed works or forwards them on to their own client. The Artist usually finds this out by seeing the work on a website or FB feed.
  • The Artist never gets paid and receives continued assurances that payment will come once the client receives payment from their own client.

What a horrible position for the Artist to find themselves in, and what an unsustainable reputation for the client to establish within the market!

But, not all hope is lost—copyright law can help the Artist gain some leverage in negotiating a resolution. The main thing the Artist should remember is that copyright in the images remain with the Author until there is an affirmative act to assign or license those rights to another. The Artist is the Author and retains copyright, unless they are 1) the employee of the client or 2) there is a written, signed agreement that defines the work as a Work Made For Hire, assigns the work, or licenses the work.

Without a WRITTEN AGREEMENT, a contract Artist has not given the client any rights to reproduce, display, or otherwise use the work. This can often provide a lot of pressure to get payment when the Artist clarifies this to the client. Without rights in the work, the client is arguably infringing on the Artist’s copyright when reusing the work or selling it to a third-party. In our experience, a well-crafted cease and desist notice to the third party can generate immediate attention and payment.

Even with a written agreement, the doctrine of Work Made for Hire is often misunderstood by artists and their clients. Very few types of projects qualify for treatment as a Work Made for Hire. Even if there is a clause that attempts to identify the client as the copyright owner, it often fails.

Of course, every situation is different and you should contact a lawyer that specializes in artist representation before taking action. Your attorney can help you review communications and written agreements to assess what next steps can help you get paid.

To help minimize the potential for conflict, always get your agreement in writing and clarify when payment is due (payable in stages with various deliverables, and never dependent upon whether the Artist’s client gets paid by a third party).

If you need assistance getting paid for your work or understanding the contract you’re being asked to sign, contact me at carolinekert@danieltgoodwin.com; 303.763.1615. I’m happy to help.


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